Winter 2017 in Review – March comes in like a Lion

I feel like I’ve talked a lot about this series already in some other posts , but I feel like I need to quickly summarize my thoughts on it. March comes in like a Lion is a fantastic series. This is one of my favorite shows of the season . Rakugo is my favorite at the moment because I think its way more consistent in what it’s trying to accomplish, but Rakugo has the highest highs and the lowest lows. If I could compare it to something in anyway, I think it’s a less adult Nana or a Nana light if you will. March never gets as adult as Nana does though because it still revolves around somebody who is still high school age. Though I guess that isn’t saying much when it comes to something like Scum’s Wish airing this season. Anyway, it’s a slice of life series in the best since because it’s not goofy moe girls during things, it’s follows a young adult by the name of Rei Kiriyama who is trying to find his way through life.

March’s driving force is Shogi. It is what state of mind Rei is in, the way he gets friends, and so many things. You can call it Rei’s driving force or his life. The main point of the series is exploring Rei’s depression. That is why he is more than a vessel for all this side characters and plot of the series. He’s a great character as well and we see the world through his eyes. There are a lot of excellent, well developed side characters as well, as I have discussed previously, but this series wouldn’t be even close to the same thing if we only had a plain character with no personality as our guiding force. Rei is antisocial, an outsider, and has a major case of depression because of what happened to his family early in his life and the series is about Rei climbing out of it. I’ve never faced it myself, but it doesn’t look like an easy process.

From a production stand point, March comes in like a Lion is pretty mixed. I am not familiar with Studio Shaft’s production values, but from a screen shot point of view, it looks fantastic. Animation can range from being amazing to eh, but that’s fine. This is not a series that needs top notch animation to get its point across. Also the shaftisms. Tilted heads and all the abstract things come with the territory. The imaginary was well used to define Rei’s different emotional states and telling us how shogi games are going without us knowing what they are. I still don’t like the head tilts that much, but I can look past them.

So yes, go ahead and watch this show. Please. It’s great. Twenty two episodes of great characters, well done plot, and some of best slice of stuff you will ever see. I highly recommend this series to everyone. So glad it’s getting a new season in the fall. This is a series that deserves it.

7 Comments Add yours

  1. Karandi says:

    Have to agree. This is definitely a show worth watching. While I haven’t loved every minute of every episode, I have loved watching Rei’s journey and overall the show is pretty brilliant. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Scott says:

      Thanks for reading!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. NEETaku says:

    The art style reminds me a lot of Honer and Clover. I might check this one out

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Scott says:

      It’s from the same mangaka.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. NEETaku says:

        Oh. No wonder

        Like

  3. Thanks for your post – I stumbled on the themed cafe for this anime in Tokyo last year – the anime looked very charming from the drawings including the cats. I haven’t fallen in love totally with it as I can’t feel captivated by Rei’s anti-social and slow character development but I still end up reading about it from people’s posts! So I still follow it in a way because I watched the first couple of episodes!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Scott says:

      I really hate saying things like this, but around episode 5 are when Rei’s motivations and why he is the way he is are reveled. Until then, it’s a bit of a slog.

      Like

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